University to Boston Herald: Suffolk You!

January 21, 2015

As the hardreading staff has dutifully chronicled, the Boston Herald has been a satellite campus of Suffolk University for years now, including – but not limited to – their joint Press Party Wayne’s World webcast, their Race for Governor tag-teaming of the 2014 Massachusetts gubernatorial election, their Inside the Race for Mayor for the 2013 Boston mayoral race, the John Nucci Connection (sounds like a ’60s British Invasion band, no?), and etc.

So imagine our surprise when this ad turned up not in the bestie local tabloid, but in the Boston Globe.

 

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Inspire that, Heraldniks. Right where it hurts.

Some success story . . .


Hark! The Herald! (Democratic Guv Debate)

August 25, 2014

From our Walt Whitman desk

So. Is the Massachusetts Democratic gubernatorial primary primarily – inexorably – changed now that the candidates have had their debate on Boston Herald Radio?

‘Cause that’s what today’s feisty local tabloid promised.

Start, as  always, with Page On, the top half of which touts the Big Bakeoff.

 

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Inside, the Herald has two pages of new/hype in anticipation of the main event.

 

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Tale of the tape:

 

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And just in case you haven’t grasped the transformative power of a debate on Internet radio, the Herald scribes all strike the same chord in their ledes.

Jaclyn Cashman:

Leave your talking points at the door. Save your stump speeches for the campaign trail. At today’s Boston Herald Radio debate, we’re aiming for a free-flowing conversation where we’ll learn more about the three candidates facing off in the Democratic gubernatorial primary.

 

Joe Battenfeld:

It’s a long shot, but there’s still a way for Attorney General Martha Coakley to lose the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, and it would have to start at today’s Boston Herald Radio debate.

Coakley’s campaign is showing signs of cracking. Democratic party leaders are getting worried it will be 2010 all over again.

 

John Nucci:

Believe it or not, the primary election is just over two weeks away, and Democrats face a critical choice on who will represent their party in November. The timing of today’s Democratic gubernatorial debate on Boston Herald Radio makes it pivotal, and likely to set the tone for the closing days.

 

As of 1 pm – the debate’s over, the poll numbers are out – here’s the only coverage the hardsearching staff could find: A Boston Globe online recap.

In bitter debate, Democratic gubernatorial candidates take aim at each other, Baker

In the most bitter debate of Democratic gubernatorial race so far, Treasurer Steven Grossman sharply questioned the judgment of frontrunner Martha Coakley, painting her a protector of the Beacon Hill establishment, as former Medicare and Medicaid chief Don Berwick attacked his two rivals for their support of casino gambling in the state and their years-long embrace of “politics as usual.”

Coakley, the attorney general, defended herself, offered a few hits on Grossman, but also aimed some fire at Republican Charlie Baker, who is expected to be his party’s gubernatorial nominee.

Just over two weeks before the Sept. 9 state primary, the three Democratic candidates vying for their party’s nod upped their rhetoric against each other right from the beginning of an hour-long Boston Herald Radio debate at the newspaper’s Seaport headquarters.

 

Oh, wait – here’s the Herald recap:

Coakley, Grossman and Berwick let loose on Herald Radio debate

cpdcandidates

The debate between the Democratic candidates for governor kicked off in high gear today as Treasurer Steve Grossman went on the attack over Attorney General Martha Coakley’s $100,000 settlement with a lobbying group.

“It’s the worst form of judgment,” said Grossman, who slammed what he called the go-easy environment on Beacon Hill.

 

Not so easy-going off Beacon Hill though.

The Herald knows it’s not who listened to the web stream of the debate that will determine its impact. It’s the play the debate gets in the rest of the news media that counts.

Stay tuned.

 


Hark! The Herald! (Wayne’s World Debate Edition)

June 9, 2014

The Boston Herald has slowly evolved into a cross between The Onion and one big selfie.

Exhibit Umpteen: The feisty local tabloid’s hyperventilating coverage today of . . . itself! Specifically the gubernatorial debate the the Herald will stream on its website tomorrow.

Representative samples range from this announcement . . .

 

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. . . to Hillary “Cassandra” Chabot’s dire warning to Martha Coakley . . .

 

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. . . to John “Cassandra” Nucci’s dire warning to everyone else . . .

 

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Wow. So, presumably, there will be a tremendous web audience tomorrow morning, extensive media coverage of the debate, and serious repercussions for the candidates.

Wow.

 


What Can the Herald Do for Brown? (Looking Like ‘No’ Hampshire Edition)

March 7, 2014

Tough sledding for Scott Brown (R-Elsewhere) in the feisty local tabloid today: No snow (and yes, I’m looking’ at you, Marv).

The Brownout starts right off on Page One. (And a warm Two-Daily Town welcome to our first Inexplicable Little Green Three!)

 

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From there, it’s on to the low-priced spread inside.

 

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You’ve got some knee-buckling poll numbers from David Paleologos there, along with long-face analysis from John Nucci. (On the next page Howie Carr does some whistling past the graveyard for good measure.)

All in all, not the best press day for Downturn Scottie.

 


Globe: No Problem with Walsh’s Koh Dependency

January 5, 2014

According to today’s Boston Globe, Mayor-elect Marty Walsh has named a “relative political outsider” who is “relatively young” as his City Hall wingman – and that’s all good.

Walsh announces his chief of staff

Andover native, 29, has worked in politics, at Huffington Post

Boston Mayor-elect Martin J. Walsh on Saturday named Daniel Arrigg Koh, currently the general manager of Huffington Post Live, handout_koh_metas his chief of staff — the first major appointment in the administration that takes over control of the city on Monday.

“I’m excited to have Daniel joining our administration and bring a fresh, new energy to the mayor’s office,” Walsh said in a statement issued Saturday afternoon. “He has broad experience about City Hall and a deep understanding of managing a large, fast-paced organization. We have great talent joining us, and I know Daniel will help me transform the way we do things in Boston.”

 

And nary a discouraging word after that.

Not so fast, says crosstown rival Boston Herald on today’s front page.

 

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Inside, the feisty local tabloid elaborates.

Walsh names neophyte to key position

Some say mayor-elect taking a risk

Picking a 29-year-old political unknown as chief of staff is a bold, unexpected move and a sign that Mayor-elect Martin J. Walsh’s 010414Walshjm03administration is shaping up to take a new direction in City Hall — although the hire also is not without risks, experts said.

Daniel Arrigg Koh — an Andover native who last worked as general manager of HuffPost Live and a former adviser through Harvard’s Leadership Fellow Program for Mayor Thomas M. Menino — represents a young, intelligent hire with an impeccable resume, said John Nucci, Suffolk University vice president for government affairs.

 

Or maybe this . . .

Daniel Koh might be too young and too green to navigate the pitfalls of City Hall politics effectively, said Thomas J. Whalen, a Boston University social science professor. Walsh should have compensated for his own inexperience in City Hall by hiring someone well-versed in the political landscape, he said.

“This is a huge job. You think you would have someone who is older, more experienced and more connected,” Whalen said, adding that Koh will have to tangle with the city’s union leaders. “You’ll need a tough guy who can knock heads together. Will they respect someone 29 years old?”

 

Well, we know at least one person who doesn’t.

Leave it, as usual, to Herald graybeard Peter Gelzinis to provide some historical perspective in a piece headlined Koh may be right-hand man, but not clear he’ll be a heavyweight.

In his fifth and final go-round as mayor, Tom Menino looked across the river to Harvard and installed whiz-kid Mitch Weiss as his chief of staff. A beloved old pol craved new blood. And yet the man he trusted to handle the day-to-day life blood of politics was an up-from-the-streets-Southie native, Michael Kineavy.

It was a kind of schizophrenia that just about everyone in City Hall came to understand. “Kineavy was the get-it-done on the ground guy,” one longtime veteran said. “He was the guy that made government work in a way everyone understood.

 

The Herald covered a lot of bases on this story. Presumably, the Globe will play some catch-up tomorrow.


Boston Herald Suffolks Up Again

December 2, 2013

It’s all gubernatorial all the time at the feisty local tabloid today.

 

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Start with the Herald’s big announcement:

Herald, Suffolk U. team for gov race

On to the race for governor!

The Herald and Suffolk University, building on the success of an innovative partnership in providing in-depth coverage of the Boston mayoral race, are teaming up again for the Massachusetts governor’s race.SuffolkHerald_Gov1col

Respected pollster David Paleologos will offer his surveys and analysis exclusively in the Herald along with deep behind-the-numbers analysis in his featured “Poll Pal” column. Suffolk’s John Nucci will weigh in with commentary on the latest from the campaign trail alongside Herald reporters and columnists.

New this campaign cycle will be “Boiler Room,” a webcast featuring Suffolk students and professors joining Herald political staffers and GOP and Democratic strategists to look closely at the issues and campaign messages.

 

Here’s how that looks:

 

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And this:

 

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And this:

 

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We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: The Herald should be covering Suffolk University, not serving as its satellite campus.

But wait! There’s actually a Suffolk-Free Zone at the Herald, starting with Hillary Chabot’s column on the Menino Machine being up for grabs in the gubernatorial race.

The impending demise of Mayor Tom 
Menino’s king-making political machinery means Boston is wide open in the upcoming gubernatorial race — and even GOP candidate Charlie Baker is looking to make inroads in the true blue city.

“I think Boston will be very much in play,” said former Boston City Councilor John Tobin, who noted that the same well-honed operation that clinched statewide elections for Gov. Deval Patrick and U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren will fragment when Menino leaves office in January.

“There’s a splintering effect,” Tobin said. “It took a long time to build that machine and it’s going to be interesting to see how the race takes shape.”

 

Not surprising then that Holly Robichaud’s piece predicts blood ‘n’ guts in the Democratic primary.

Nationally many congressional Democrats in vulnerable seats have already started to abandon the Obama regime and the Obamascare law. With millions more voters about to lose their employer health insurance coverage, the ranks of mutiny will grow.

Back here at home the division will be brought on by a nasty Democrat gubernatorial primary now that John Walsh is no longer the state party chairman. There will be no clearing of the field like Walsh did for Lizzy Warren.

It’s going to be a Democrat shootout at the O.K. Corral between Attorney General Marsha [really?] Coakley and state Treasurer Steve Grossman as they fight for their political lives.

That’s what Two-Time Charlie Baker is hoping as well.

(Crosstown rival Boston Globe, meanwhile, looks at a potentially pesky partnership Baker might have if Karyn Polito succeeds in a GOP lieutenant governor bid.)

Let the [your campaign spending estimate goes here] rumpus begin!


Sunday Herald Wins Boston Mayoral Race

September 8, 2013

If you’re looking to dig into Boston’s mayoral scrum, today’s Boston Herald is the place to go.

The feisty local tabloid devotes three full pages to the preliminary race.

 

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The City Hall bakeoff also gets a column from Suffolk University’s Herald embed John Nucci, along with half of Matt Stout’s Pols & Politics piece.

Crosstown, the Boston Globe has . . . well, a lot less. There’s this story on B2 (print headline):

Lee_conley2_metConley criticizes rivals on casino

Says councilors should back citywide vote

Suffolk County district attorney and Boston mayoral candidate Daniel F. Conley on Saturday doubled-down on his calls for a citywide vote on a proposed casino in East Boston and sharply criticized the city councilors running against him for not holding community hearings on the issue.

But despite his repeated calls for a citywide vote, council members continued to stand by their decision to allow East Boston residents exclusively to decide if their community becomes home to casino gambling.

 

The stately local broadsheet also features this opinion piece by Boston Review managing editor Simon Waxman.

wide-cityhall0908Can Boston break identity politics?

In Boston, identity politics have been such a powerful influence in local elections that candidates have literally changed their identities. Early in his career, future US House Speaker John McCormack rewrote his family history to better align it with those of the local political bosses and to erase any hint of Protestantism. Among other revisions, his Scottish-Canadian father and Boston-born Irish-American mother became Irish immigrants. He was inspired in part by John Way, a Yankee Democrat who repeatedly failed to win office despite running on a staunch pro-Irish-Catholic ticket.

In the 1960s and ’70s, Louise Day Hicks, William Bulger, and others updated identity politics in Boston. Hicks gained popularity as a defender of working-class white interests against desegregation and what she called “civil rights infiltrators.”

 

And, Waxman writes, “in 1983, the only time a black candidate made it to the final round of a Boston mayoral contest, an electorate sharply divided on racial lines handed Ray Flynn a landslide victory over Mel King.”

What does he want?

For Bostonians to rely less on racial identity in their voting decisions, and “for the candidates to set out individual agendas and give the voters more, and perhaps better, reasons to support them.”

When does he want it?

Now.