Hark! The Herald! (Pimp Our Pages Edition)

July 3, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

As the hardreading staff has relentlessly chronicled, the Boston Herald is excessively adept at promoting itself in the guise of news reporting. But the selfie local tabloid is blazing new trails in its weekly Gretta Style features.

Stylish logo:

 

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Yesterday’s edition:

 

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Soup to nuts graf:

As for what to wear, I’m all about Barbara Biu’s metallic slides ($340) paired with a Lemlem patio dress ($245), both of which you’ll find on shelves at Grettaluxe in Wellesley now . . .

And as an ode to the holiday, make sure to bring Chloe’s red, small Faye bag ($1,390, also at Grettaluxe), a perfect summer statement to match the fiery show.

 

Oh, yeah – don’t forget the photo caption:

 

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So, to recap: This particular Gretta Style feature is all about Gretta Monahan’s Grettaluxe store in Wellesley.

On the other hand, last week’s feature was all about Gretta Monahan’s Grettacole hair salon in Copley Square.

 

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Drive you nuts graf:

 

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So, to recap again: The Boston Herald is giving over its news pages to Gretta Monahan every week so she can promote her various enterprises.

Inevitable conclusions:

1) The Herald is paying Monahan to produce these features, which is a crime against common sense.

2) Monahan is paying the Herald to produce these features, which is a crime against journalistic ethics.

3) No money is changing hands, which is a crime against Herald readers.

The headscratching staff will make some phone calls today to sort out those options, but we don’t expect anyone will talk to us.

Regardless, as always, we’ll keep you posted.


Guzzi or Guzzn’t He?

June 30, 2015

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

After 19 years as president and CEO of the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce, Paul Guzzi is stepping down. As a sort of parting gift, he ran this full-page ad in today’s Boston Herald.

 

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Crosstown at the Boston Globe – no ad. Then again, why pay for what the Globe will provide for free. Bottom of today’s Business front:

 

 

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Top of C2:

 

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Guzzi is moving on the become board chairman at the Citi Performing Arts Center, where he’ll undoubtedly run many more ads in the stately local broadsheet than the thirsty local tabloid.

Regardless, all best to all involved.


Hark! The Herald! (Journalism Awards Edition)

June 29, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

The hardreading staff has a track record of being, well, hard on the selfie local tabloid. But we also believe in giving credit where credit’s due.

So, from Sunday’s Boston Herald, which is read by up to several people.

 

 

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The Associated Press Media Editors announced its awards earlier this month. Oddly, the only category without a winner was the aforementioned Innovator of the Year.

 

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Maybe it’s still TBA. If so, we’re sure the finalist local tabloid will let u know.

The SPJ Sigma Delta Chi medal, on the other hand, was already trumpeted by the Herald two months ago.

Not to get technical about it.

Regardless, sincere kudos to the Heraldniks.

The hardreading staff is, obviously, glad you’re here.


Energy Bigwigs Dodge Two-Daily Town Investigation!

June 27, 2015

As you splendid readers might (or probably don’t) remember, the hardreading staff a couple of days ago (people everywhere: please note the of) detailed the advertising efforts of two front groups for energy concerns: one natural gas, the other nuclear power.

Diligent as always, we wrote to both mouthpieces for more information.

To the fine folks at The Coalition to Lower Energy Costs, we sent this:

Dear Sir or Madam,

[We] write the blog It’s Good to Live in a Two Daily Town, and [we] noticed that you ran an ad in today’s Boston Herald but not the Boston Globe.

Might you share your advertising strategy with [our] splendid readers?

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
[The Hardreading Staff]

 

To the fine folks at Nuclear Matters, we sent this:

Dear Sir or Madam,

[We] write the blog It’s Good to Live in a Two Daily Town, and [we] noticed that in today’s Boston Globe you ran the same ad twice.

Might you share your advertising strategy with [our] splendid readers?

Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
[The Hardworking Staff]

 

Thirty-six hours later?

Nothing!

These guys are on the run! We’re thinking Kickstarter for our travel expenses.

P.S. The natural gas front group did run an ad in yesterday’s Globe Capital section.

 

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Day late, dollar shot.


EXTRA! Thirsty Local Tabloid Gets Ad Love!

June 25, 2015

From our Local Dailies DisADvantage desk

As the hardreading staff noted yesterday, the Boston Herald continues to be the wallflower at the local advertising dance.

Except today.

Lo and behold, occupying the entirety of page 9 was this ad, paid for by some outfit called the Coalition to Lower Energy Costs.

 

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Curious as always, we hied ourselves to the group’s website, which says this about the coalition:

The Coalition to Lower Energy Costs is a non-profit Massachusetts association of individual consumers, labor unions, larger energy consumers and institutions concerned about the threat to New England’s families and economy from skyrocketing natural gas and electric prices. The coalition advocates for the new infrastructure we need to give all of us access to an adequate natural gas supply and lower our energy cost. This will require substantial new pipeline capacity, including one new pipeline from western Massachusetts to Dracut.

 

Huh. We kind of assumed some natural gas companies might be involved. They could, of course, be those “institutions concerned about the threat to New England’s families and economy from skyrocketing natural gas and electric prices” the website mentions. The About Us page doesn’t say.

But WMUR’s redoubtable John DiStaso does in this piece.

Pro-gas pipeline group makes regional push with new TV ad

Coalition to Lower Energy cost has ties to Kinder Morgan energy firm

img-Kinder-Morgan-pipeline-proposal-draws-opposition

MANCHESTER, N.H. —A group with ties to the proponents of the Northeast Energy Direct pipeline, proposed by the Kinder Morgan energy company, has begun advertising on WMUR and other television stations in New England.

The Coalition to Lower Energy Costs has purchased time to air an ad 30 times over two weeks on the New Hampshire’s largest television station at a cost of more than $70,000.

Anthony Buxton, a Maine-based attorney who is a leader of the coalition and also represents Kinder Morgan in a Maine Public Utilities Commission proceeding, said plans call for the ad to air for a total of about three weeks on WMUR. He said it will also air on another New Hampshire television station, as well as two Maine stations and “several stations in Boston,” at a total cost of “several hundred thousand dollars.”

 

Here’s the spot:

 

 

So, mystery solved, yes? Well, no. Why run the print ad in the Herald but not the Boston Globe? Intrepid as ever, we’re sending an email to the coalition to ask.

Wanna know something else that’s strange? A different energy group – Nuclear Matters (you can read about them here) –  ran this full-page ad 0n A11 in today’s Globe.

 

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But that’s not the strange part. The strange part is the same ad ran on A13.

 

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Huh? We’re sending them an email too.

P.S. The Nuclear Matters ad also ran in the Herald. Good day for the firsty local tabloid, eh?


New Casino Slots Opening Ad in Globe, Not Herald

June 25, 2015

From our Local Daily DisADvantage desk

Plainridge Park – the “first and only” (so far) casino in Massachusetts – opened yesterday in the aptly named town of Plainville. (And no, we didn’t know where Plainville is, either.)

But yes, the gambling hell (as Raymond Chandler would call it) did take out a full-page ad in yesterday’s Boston Globe to celebrate the big event.

 

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But not, interestingly, in the Boston Herald.

Not to stereotype or anything, but if you’re trolling for slots parlor habitués, wouldn’t you bet on the free-spending readers of the thirsty local tabloid over the tight-fisted readers of the stingy local broadsheet?

Just askin’.


Hark! The Herald! (Michael Goldman/MBTA Edition)

June 24, 2015

From our Walt Whitman desk

Today’s Boston Herald features the latest in its series of told-you-so front pages.

 

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Helpful close-up:

 

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The story inside focuses on the $300,000 ad campaign the MBTA’s Boston Carmen’s Union has been running for several months.

ON THE CAMPAIGN RAIL

Carmen spent $300G on ads to battle Baker’s MBTA reform

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The powerful Boston Carmen’s Union, in a bid to derail Gov. Charlie Baker’s MBTA reforms, has spent $300,000 on radio ads, organized campaign-style phone banks and poured thousands into the political coffers of key lawmakers and politicians 
overseeing T policy, a Herald 
review found.

The review shows the 6,000-member-strong labor group’s mounting resistance as a top legislative committee has rebuffed Baker’s key reforms . . .

 

The Herald’s Erin Smith and Matt Stout write, “[t]he carmen have put out three radio spots, at a cost of $300,000, so far, with a fourth expected by the end of the week and the campaign isn’t over yet, according to longtime Democratic campaign operative Michael Goldman, who is coordinating the media strategy for Local 589.” (Listen to one here.)

There’s also a radio blitz on local airwaves from the Amalgamated Transit Union, which Goldman says he’s not associated with. Of the union’s “we’re here to help” ads Goldman says, “[our] thing has been positive commercials.”

Positive, maybe, but not all that reliable, as CommonWealth magazine pointed out last month.

One ad says, “Given the advanced age of current equipment and tracks, it’s a miracle that fully 95 percent of the million-plus trips made each year have been completed on time. But the T transit workers won’t be satisfied until that number reaches 100 percent.”

Yeah. Except the Carmen’s Union definition of “completed on time” is . . . “actually happened.” If you define completed on time as “arrived at destination on schedule,” that 95% drops to around 72% (67% this year so far) according to CommonWealth’s Steve Koczlea and Bruce Mohl.

So, once again we see that MBTA=Might Be Totally Accurate.

Or might not.


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